Recommended Readings Archive


[12/3/2018] Q and A: Making Sense of Universal Design for Learning

Lieberman, M. (Nov. 28, 2018). Q&A: Making sense of universal design for learning. Inside Higher Ed. Retrieved from https://tinyurl.com/y7zlkrn7.

Universal design for learning (UDL) is an approach to course design and teaching and that focuses on ways to remove or mitigate barriers to student learning. In this Q&A article, Tobin and Behling, authors of a new book on UDL, discuss the motivations behind UDL, its implications for higher education, and their own experiences with faculty who have implemented UDL in their classes.

[11/27/2018] Have Your Cake and Eat It Too: Tips for Finding Diverse, High-Quality, Affordable Course Material

Gonin, M. (2018, October 24). Have your cake and eat it too: Tips for finding diverse, high-quality, affordable course materialCenter for Innovative Teaching and Learning @ IUB Blog. Retrieved from http://go.iu.edu/28tC

Open Educational Resources (OERs) are educational materials that are public domain or open licensed to allow use and reproduction without fees. While there is a wealth of OERs, it can be difficult to locate exactly what you need. This blog from the Bloomington teaching center discusses options for finding and creating affordable course materials for your students

[11/15/2018] The Power of Transparency in your Teaching

Mulnix, A. (2018, November 12). The power of transparency in your teaching. Faculty Focus. 

It is sometimes difficult to articulate higher-order thinking processes to our students. This article provides an example of how a biology instructor made their thinking visible to students and simultaneously engage in metacognition about their own teaching.

[11/12/2018] The Power of Transparency in your Teaching

Mulnix, A. (2018, November 12). The power of transparency in your teaching. Faculty Focus. 

It is sometimes difficult to articulate higher-order thinking processes to our students. This article provides an example of how a biology instructor made their thinking visible to students and simultaneously engage in metacognition about their own teaching.

[11/2/2018] Strategies for Creating More Trans*-affirmative Classrooms

Nicolazzo, Z. (2018, October 12). Strategies for creating more trans*-affirmative classroomsInside Higher Ed.

Transgender students face a number of challenges while in college, including attending classes. In this article, the author encourages instructors to take an active role in creating a welcoming environment for transgender students and discusses several strategies instructors can use in their classroom to achieve this goal.

[10/29/2018] Jedi Training: Developing Habits of Perception in Our Disciplines

Parrish, G. (2018, Sept. 5). Jedi training: Developing habits of perception in our disciplines. Faculty Focus.  https://tinyurl.com/ycunpwq7

As a practitioner in your discipline, you develop habits of mind over the years. Disciplinary ways of looking at and thinking about things are often implicit but faculty often wonder why it is so difficult to convey to their students. In this article, Parrish discusses class activities that can be used to make these habits of mind explicit and provide students with structured opportunities to practice the habits themselves.

[10/25/2018] Remembering to Learn: Five Factors for Improving Recall

Herold, D. (2018, October 11). Remembering to learn: five factors for improving recall. Faculty Focushttps://goo.gl/hSX2x4

In this article, IUPUI’s Dr. Debbie Herold shares research-based strategies for helping student engage in deep learning and recall content effectively and efficiently.

[10/23/2018] Remembering to Learn: Five Factors for Improving Recall

Herold, D. (2018, October 11). Remembering to learn: five factors for improving recall. Faculty Focushttps://goo.gl/hSX2x4

In this article, IUPUI’s Dr. Debbie Herold shares research-based strategies for helping student engage in deep learning and recall content effectively and efficiently.

[10/16/2018] Seven Bricks to Lay the Foundation for Productive Difficult Dialogues

Soisson, A. (2018, October 16). Seven bricks to lay the foundation for productive difficult dialogues. Faculty Focushttps://goo.gl/f3pBHa.

This article provides strategies for in-class dialogues that were planned but did not go particularly well; in-class hot moments that were not anticipated and that the faculty member did not feel equipped to handle; and difficult dialogues that happen during office hours or outside of class.

[10/9/2018] The Myths of the Digital Native and the Multitasker

Kirschner, P. A., & De Bruyckere, P. (2017). The myths of the digital native and the multitasker. Teaching and Teacher Education, 67, 135-142. http://bit.ly/2NcV5sk.

As instructors in the 21st century, it can be easy to make assumptions about our students’ technical skills and abilities. In this brief article, Kirschner and Bruyckere debunk the notion of digital natives and discuss the instructional problems these dangerous assumptions create.

[10/3/2018] Students Riding on Coattails during Group Work? Five Simple Ideas to Try.

Huang, L. (2018, September 20). Students riding on coattails during group work? Five simple ideas to try. Faculty Focushttps://goo.gl/2DjPY8.

As instructors in the 21st century, it can be easy to make assumptions about our students’ technical skills and abilities. In this brief article, Kirschner and Bruyckere debunk the notion of digital natives and discuss the instructional problems these dangerous assumptions create.

[9/25/2018] Will Trying New Teaching Techniques Tank My Evaluations?

Lederman, D. (2018, September 12). Will trying new teaching techniques tank my evaluations? Inside Digital Learninghttps://bit.ly/2xK7huA.

Do you hesitate to experiment in the classroom, for fear your student evaluations will suffer as a result? A new study out of Western Michigan University set out to test that assumption, and the findings suggest that moderate changes can in fact improve evaluations.

[9/18/2018] Responding to Microaggressions in the Classroom: Taking ACTION

Souza, T. (2018, April 30). Responding to microaggressions in the classroom: Taking ACTION. Faculty Focus. https://goo.gl/27QhBr.

When students make comments that are micro-aggressive in the classroom, doing nothing is a damaging option. The ACTION framework can be a tool that is quickly retrieved by an instructor to organize thoughts and unpack the microaggression in a way that addresses the situation and cools down tension.

[9/11/2018] Take Advantage of Opportunities to Sustain Your Instructional Vitality

Weimer, M. (2018, July 26). Take advantage of opportunities to sustain your instructional vitality. Faculty Focus. https://goo.gl/nbYWbz

Students now more than ever need instructors who are committed to their teaching, but it’s difficult for instructors to stay enthusiastic and fresh in their instructional approach. Here is an article that can be a multivitamin for your teaching self.

[9/4/2018] One Way to Show Students You Care – and Why You Might Want to Try It

Supiano, B. (2018, August 29). One way to show students you care – and why you might want to try it. The Chronicle of Higher Education. https://goo.gl/jSnkzz.

During the course of a student’s college experience, they may encounter personal challenges, such as a death in their family, that impede their learning. This article discusses how instructors can encourage their students to reach out to them during such challenges and includes an example of language instructors can include in their syllabi.

[8/28/2018] Will My Students Actually Want to Do This Assignment

Gooblar, D. (2018, August 13). Will my students actually want to do this assignment? Chronicle of Higher Education

Student motivation is one of many important issues to consider when creating a new assignment or an assignment’s design. This article provides advice about how to think about assignments from the perspective of students.

[8/21/2018] Finding the Instructional Value in Peer Review Discussion Boards

Hobbs, P. & Kropp, E. (2018, June 22). Finding the instructional value in peer review discussion boards. Faculty Focus

It’s easy to assume that students understand how and why to give peer feedback, but that is not always the case. It can be especially awkward in online discussions. Instructor involvement, both modelling and coaching, can be the key to student engagement and learning in peer review activities.

[8/14/2018] How to Prepare for Class without Overpreparing

Lang, J. (2018, July, 30). How to prepare for class without over-preparing. The Chronicle of Higher Education. https://goo.gl/JQj4Jt

Ensuring complete content coverage, excellent student evaluations, and keeping students engaged without running out of material are some reasons that can drive faculty to over-prepare for classes. This article presents tried and tested strategies that you can use to make class prep enjoyable and optimal, given the competing demands on your academic positions.

[8/7/2018] Taking The Class Temperature: Cognitive and Affective Feedback

Moore, C. & Arnold, D. (2018, June 11). Taking the class temperature: Cognitive and affective feedback. Faculty Focus

To better help your students learn, it’s important to have affective feedback from them in addition to assignment scores. There are several technology tools you can use both in the classroom and online to gather that feedback. Interested? Contact the CTL and make an appointment for a consultation.

[7/31/2018] Radical Empathy in Teaching

Jordan, J. V., & Schwartz, H. L. (2018). Radical empathy in teachingNew Directions for Teaching and Learning, 153, 25-35. 

This article demonstrates how student engagement, student learning, and student satisfaction are all improved by incorporating radical empathy in course or mentor relationships. In addition, they argue, faculty engagement and success are enriched and improved by the practices outlined.

[7/23/2018]  What Professors Can Learn about Teaching from Their Students

Supiano, B. (2017, November, 19). What professors can learn about teaching from their students. The Chronicle of Higher Education. https://goo.gl/rqbLGE

This article reports on the work a biology professor did to ensure that his students were learning as best he could teach. It outlines the steps any instructor can take to initiate change and then follow through to get an evidence-based measure of how successful the experiment was.

[7/16/2018] “Weaning Off of Email”: Encouraging Students to Use Office Hours over Email to Contact Professors 

Jackson, L. E., & Knupsky, A. (2015). “Weaning off of email”: Encouraging students to use office hours over email to contact professors. College Teaching, 63(4), 183-184.

Although office hours are a great resource for students, they are typically underutilized.  Furthermore, students may e-mail their instructors with questions that can be more easily answered in an office hour setting, which increases faculty workload and frustration.  This article provides several strategies to encourage students to use office hours and limit the use of e-mail for appropriate questions.

[7/9/2018] Good Reads for Hot Days

Lieberman, M. (2018, June 27). Good reads for hot days. Inside Higher Ed.

Interested in what's happening in digital and online education? Add one the books from Mark Lieberman's summer reading list to yours!  https://tinyurl.com/y9e72yyh

[6/25/2018] Using Assignment Choice to Promote Course Relevancy

LaGier, M.J., Using assignment choice to promote course relevancy. Faculty Focushttps://goo.gl/hcaEgQ

Giving students options in assignments to encourage them to connect course topics to their own interests is a good way to increase motivation and engagement. In this article, the author shares the way he has incorporated choice into his microbiology course.

[6/14/2018] Cheating: Can We Be Doing More to Promote Academic Integrity?

Weimer, M. (2018, May 9). Cheating: Can we be doing more to promote academic integrity? Faculty Focus. Retrieved on June 8, 2018 from goo.gl/znaNMZ.

Preventing academic misconduct commonly includes trying to prevent cheating. Despite our best efforts, an alarming number of students still cheat. This article provides five other approaches that faculty can use to promote academic integrity in their courses.

[6/11/2018] Five Keys to Motivating Students

Weimer, M. (2018, June 6). Five keys to motivating students. Faculty Focus. Retrieved on June 8, 2018 from https://goo.gl/af85W7

Student motivation is a key ingredient for their success in your course! Here are eight research-based teaching recommendations that you can try to fuel your students’ motivation. 

[6/5/2018] Technology Can Address Accessibility -- to an Extent

Lieberman, M. (2018, May 2). Technology can address accessibility -- to an extent.  Inside Digital Learning. (https://tinyurl.com/y8cbuoka)

We all need to do more to make sure our content is accessible to all of our students.  Technology can provide some assistance, but it may only point out superficial problems and miss some of the deeper issues of accessibility.

[5/24/2018] How to Read a Student Evaluation and Making Sense of Student Written Comments

1. Perlmutter, D. D. (2011, October 30). How to read a student evaluation. The Chronicle of Higher Education.  Retrieved from https://www.chronicle.com/article/How-to-Read-a-Student/129553.

 Not sure what to do with your student evaluations? This article has advice both on how to use them to improve your teaching and what to keep in mind regarding their impact on how your teaching is evaluated.

2. Lewis, K. G. (2001). Making sense of student written comments. New Directions for Teaching and Learning, 87, 25-32. Retrieved from https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/pdf/10.1002/tl.25.

If you’d like more detail on how to organize students’ written comments to identify patterns and trends, see this article by Karron Lewis.

[5/22/2018] Improving the Quality of Constructive Peer Feedback

Waggoner Denton, A. (2018). Improving the quality of constructive peer feedback. College Teaching, 66(1), 22-23. Retrieved on May 15, 2018 from goo.gl/dcZELe.

Peer feedback is a common instructional method used to provide students with feedback on assignments. This article provides strategies that can be implemented to improve the quality of peer feedback that students receive. The author also reported that using the revised peer feedback method required minimal time and effort and resulted in an increase in student learning.

 

[5/15/2018] Participation Points: Making Student Engagement Visible

Almagno, S. (2017, March 13). Participation points: Making student engagement visible. Faculty Focus. Retrieved from https://tinyurl.com/ydduezlm

We assign “participation points” to encourage (or compel) student engagement because we know it leads to learning gains—but how to do we teach students that engagement is worthwhile and its own reward? Stephanie Almagno tries to answer the question, “How do we help our students shift from grade seekers to knowledge seekers?”

 

[5/4/2018] Using Your Instructor Bio to Humanize Course, Reduce Student Anxiety

Kropp, E. (2018, April 20). Using your instructor bio to humanize course, reduce student anxiety. Magna Publications. Retrieved from https://tinyurl.com/y82ebmwa

Becoming acquainted with new courses and new faculty members can be a stressful, anxiety producing experience for students. In this article, Dr. Evan Kropp discusses how faculty can leverage the "about me" section of their course site to make the course more approachable and reduce student anxiety which is of particular importance in fully online courses where students never meet their instructor face-to-face. 

[5/1/2018] A Professor’s Report Card: End of Semester Self-Assessment as New Faculty

Williams, E.A. (2017, December 15). A professor’s report card: End of semester self-assessment as new faculty. HigherEdJobs: Career News. Retrieved on May 1, 2018 from https://goo.gl/DqhYSM.

As the semester ends and student evaluations of teaching are being compiled, this article suggests using self-reflection of one’s teaching practices as another strategy to improve teaching skills. Even though the article addresses new faculty, these self-assessment questions can be used by all faculty.

[2/23/2018] What Research Tells Us about Online Discussion

Orlando, J. (2017). What research tells us about online discussion. Magna Publications. Retrieved February 19 from https://goo.gl/JvvQmd.

Creating fruitful online discussions requires more than simply posing a question in Canvas. This article offers suggestions for maximizing the benefits of online discussions.

[2/20/2018] 2018 Key Issues in Teaching and Learning

Educause Learning Initiative (2018, February). 2018 Key issues in teaching and learning. ELI Newshttps://tinyurl.com/gqfcwoq

Every year, ELI surveys the higher education community to determine key issues and opportunities in post-secondary teaching and learning. Read this article to see and explore the 15 key issues identified for 2018.

[2/11/2018] Are You Being Rigorous or Just Intolerant? How to Promote Mental Health in the College Classroom

Savini, C. (2016, May 4). Are you being rigorous or just Intolerant? How to promote mental health in the college classroom. Chronicle of Higher Ed. Retrieved February 12, 2018 from https://goo.gl/YNRDpc

An increasing number of college students experience mental health issues.  However, few of them receive treatment due to fear of being stigmatized.  This article discusses how instructors may fail to recognize students with mental health issues and provides instructional strategies to promote equitable classroom environments for these individuals.

[2/6/2018] 10 Key Points About Active Learning

Davidson, C.N. (2018, January 25). 10 key points about active learning. Inside Higher Ed. Retrieved February 5, 2018 from https://goo.gl/wKi3sA.

Using active learning in the classroom can pose challenges for instructors and students. This article provides tips for creating effective active learning environments that can thrive with student buy-in and involvement.

[4/23/2018] How Should I Study for the Exam?

Weimer, M. (2017, September 20). How should I study for the exam? Faculty Focus. Retrieved on April 16, 2018 from goo.gl/5tvRW8.   

This article includes a link to a survey that can be implemented in any course to prompt self-reflection of study habits after an exam.  The author also briefly discusses how, despite the fact that most students say they need to study, very few actually implement effective strategies that promote deep learning.

[4/10/2018] Easy Methods for Using Virtual, Augmented, and Mixed Reality in Your Teaching

Orlando, J. (2018, April). Easy methods for using virtual, augmented, and mixed reality in your teaching. Magna Publications. Retrieved April 16, 2018 from https://tinyurl.com/ycsjslov

The terms “virtual,” “augmented,” and “mixed” reality have been thrown around a lot lately in education, leaving many instructors understandably perplexed over their different meanings. The good news is that there are many educational uses of these applications, and a world of free educational content available to instructors.

[4/9/2018] The Sound of Silence Can Be Deafening and the Questions You Ask Your Students Can Provoke It

Aldrich, H. (2018, February). The sound of silence can be deafening and the questions you ask your students can provoke it.The National Teaching & Learning Forum. 27(2), 10-11.

Creating an inclusive and lively discussion can be a challenge. This article discusses how asking the right kinds of questions can spark an active and productive discussion in your classroom.

[4/3/2018] Are Small Classes Best? It’s Complicated

Supiano, B. (2018, March, 21). Are small classes best? It’s complicated. The Chronicle of Higher Educationhttps://tinyurl.com/ycqaswup
  
The idea that small classes are best is intuitive. With fewer students in the room, a professor should be able to devote more time to each one. But what is the connection between class size and quality, anyhow? And if small classes really are better, how do you define what counts as small? This article explores the connections (or lack thereof) between class size and student experience.

[3/27/2018] Online Can Unite Students - or Divide Them

Lieberman, M. (2018, March 21). Online can unite students – or divide them  Inside Digital Learning.   Retrieved March 27, 2018 from https://tinyurl.com/yaezmb48

A well-designed online course can level the playing field and create a welcoming community for its learners.  This article discusses how and when instructors can intentionally create opportunities for true engagement with students and among students.

[3/19/2018] How Much Do You Want Your Final to Count?

Lang, J.M. (2018, March 13). 'How much do you want your final to count?' The Chronicle of Higher Education. Retrieved March 19, 2018 from https://goo.gl/SZQPXT.

There are several ways to give students more control of their learning. Read this article to find out how an economics instructor at Tulane University let her students in a large class make meaningful choices about their course grades!

[3/13/2018] Race and Gender Bias in Online Courses

Jaschik, S. (2018, March 7). Race and gender bias in online courses. Inside Higher Ed. https://goo.gl/xP8gMM.

How equitable are online courses? This article discusses a study which found instructors of MOOCs responded to comments of white males more frequently than other students. While typical online courses have more student-instructor interactions than MOOCs, this article highlights how as instructors our implicit biases influence our students' experience.

[3/6/2018] The Case for Inclusive Teaching

Gannon, K. (2018, February 27). The case for inclusive teaching. The Chronicle of Higher Education. Retrieved March 5, 2018 from https://goo.gl/wWkqNU.

There are many reasons why teaching should be more inclusive. Perhaps the most important is that student outcomes are better when students are actively involved in their learning—and particularly among underserved student populations. Kevin Gannon makes a case for why we should teach inclusively.

[1/26/2018] If You Build It, They May Not Come

McKenzie, L. (2018, January 29). If you build it, they may not come. Inside Digital Learninghttps://tinyurl.com/y7lq5uo6

A new report highlights increased satisfaction by faculty at liberal arts colleges with online and hybrid courses, but that does not necessarily translate into higher enrollment by students. This article provides some thoughtful discussion into strategic factors that liberal arts programs should consider if increased enrollment is a goal.

[1/22/2018] Creating Active Learning Classrooms Is Not Enough: Lessons From Two Case Studies

Morrone, A.; Flaming, A.; Birdwell, T.; Russell, J., Roman, T., & Jesse, M. (2017, December 4). Creating active learning classrooms is not enough: Lessons from two case studies. Educause Review.

Recent studies have shown that classroom environments have a significant impact on teaching practices and student learning. This article cites two cases, including one from our own campus, as to how active learning classrooms not only benefit student learning, but also impact the institutional teaching culture.

[1/16/2018] Feedback: Ensuring That it Leads to Enhanced Learning

Boud, D. (2015). Feedback: ensuring that it leads to enhanced learning. The Clinical Teacher, 12(1), 3-7.

Do you find that students don’t use your feedback to improve subsequent performance? Learn about the conditions and levels of effective feedback and ways to provide feedback to support ongoing student learning.

[1/8/2018] What Meaningful Writing Means for Students

Eodice, M., Geller, A.E. & Lerner, N. (2017) What meaningful writing means for students. Peer Review, 19(1), 25. 

This article presents findings from the Meaningful Writing Project, which asked students: What was your most meaningful writing project, and why was it meaningful to you?  Discover what motivates students to write, and how you can create meaningful learning experiences for your students this semester!

[1/2/2018] Creative Approaches to the Syllabus

Jones, J.B. (2011, August 26). Creative approaches to the syllabus. The Chronicle of Higher Education. Retrieved January 2, 2018 from https://goo.gl/Gkg8si

Grandy, T. (2015, December 8). Give your syllabus an extreme redesign for the new year. Inside Higher Ed. Retrieved January 2, 2018 from https://goo.gl/R6k62N

Bart, M. (2015, July 29). A learner-centered syllabus helps set the tone for learning. Faculty Focus. Retrieved January 2, 2018 from https://goo.gl/otXaZC

Are you drafting a new syllabus or considering redesigning an existing one? These three articles provide a variety of suggestions and examples to ensure your syllabus becomes an integral and important aspect of your students’ learning.

[12/20/2017] Our Most Popular Teaching and Learning Articles

Bart, M. (2017, December 15). Top 17 of 2017: Our most popular teaching and learning articles. Faculty Focus. Retrieved on December 20, 2017 from http://go.iu.edu/1PEc . 

Faculty Focus publishes articles on effective teaching strategies for the college classroom. See which of the 200 articles they published in 2017 rose to the top 17. 

[12/12/2017] Three Ideas for Implementing Learner Reflection

Huang, L. (November 6, 2017). Three ideas for implementing learner reflection. Faculty Focus. Retrieved November 20, 2017 from https://goo.gl/1jPn8P

As you are preparing for your spring courses, consider the tips in this article to design assignments that can encourage students to critically reflect on the content and their learning experiences.

[11/29/2017] On Banning Things in Classrooms

Warner, J. (2017, November 26). On banning things in classrooms. Just Visiting, blog. Retrived from: https://www.insidehighered.com/blogs/just-visiting/banning-things-classroomshttps://goo.gl/zwqpY2

This post examines the evidence that is frequently cited in support of banning electronics in classrooms. Warner asks readers to consider the underlying reasons students resort to online shopping and other off-task behaviors, and thenegative impact of authoritarian classrooms.

[11/28/2017] Why Faculty Members Still Aren’t Sure What to Make of Education Technology

McMurtri, B. (2017, November 9). Why faculty members still aren’t sure what to make of education technology. The Chronicle of Higher Education. https://goo.gl/KT2K8a

The rapid progression of educational technology is a difficult challenge for today's faculty. It's often difficult to understand the definitions and use of the technologies... and the evidence of its effectiveness often doesn't exist yet. How do we choose technologies that really benefit students when the technology outpaces the research? 

[11/14/2017] Males Under-Estimate Academic Performance of Their Female Peers in Undergraduate Biology Classrooms

Grunspan, D. Z., Eddy, S. L., Brownell, S. E., Wiggins, B. L., Crowe, A. J., & Goodreau, S. M. (2016). Males under-estimate academic performance of their female peers in undergraduate biology classrooms. PloS one, 11(2), e0148405.

This article reveals how a social network analysis study on college-level biology students captures a surprising but consistent pattern of male students underestimating their female peers' mastery in biology. 

[11/7/2017] Faculty buy-in builds, bit by bit: Survey of faculty attitudes on technology

Lederman, D. & MacKenzie, L. (2017, October 30). Faculty buy-in builds, bit by bit: Survey of faculty attitudes on technology. Inside Higher Ed. https://goo.gl/4EA7PM.

Inside Higher Ed's 2017 Survey of Faculty Attitudes on Technology reveals that as more professors teach online, their confidence in the effectiveness of digital learning grows, though a majority question impact on vulnerable students and administrators' motives. 

[10/31/2017] Assessments that Support Student Learning

Abaci, S., Quick, J., & Morrone, A. (2017, October 9). Student engagement with e-texts: What the data tells us. Educause Review. https://goo.gl/qPSjb4.

This case study of Indiana University's e-text initiative reports on students' actual use of and engagement with digital textbooks.  Research found that higher engagement with e-texts (reading and highlighting) correlated with higher course grades.

[10/24/2017] Assessments that Support Student Learning

Weiman,C. & Gilbert, S. (2015, April). Assessments that support student lerning. Tomorrow's Professor, 1595. https://goo.gl/5nyAEE.

This review article provides several strategies that can help instructors design assessments that can not only be used to evaluate student learning, but also encourage students to monitor their own performance and improve learning.  

[10/17/2017] How the Provost Can Help Students Succeed

Canada, M. (2017, October 8). How the provost can help students succeed. The Chronicle of Higher Education, Retrieved October 15, 2017. from: http://tinyurl.com/ydgoyy7h

How can faculty and administrators in higher education create the organizational conditions within which learning-centered teaching efforts can thrive? Mark Canada, Vice Chancellor for Academic Affairs at IU-Kokomo, offers some guidelines. 

[10/9/2017] A Welcoming Classroom

Lang, J. M. (2017, September 27). A welcoming classroom. From The Chronicle of Higher Education http://tinyurl.com/ybkej9qc

This article reminds us that we often make a classroom more usable and welcoming for everybody when we do what we can to accommodate students with special needs. How do you make your course truly inclusive?  

[10/4/2017] Saved by a Hybrid

Lieberman, M. (2017, September 20). Saved by a hybrid. Inside Digital Learning

Has recent weather, as well as other natural disasters, made you think about what you would do with your course(s) if campus had to close? This article discusses how hybrid classes may be at an advantage, as students are already accustomed to having some class content delivered online. 

[9/27/2017] How to Be Political

Gooblar, D. (2017, September 21). How to Be Political. The Chronicle of Higher Education.  Retrieved September 21, 2017 from https://goo.gl/Zkakg2.

This article provides strategies for instructors to be transparent, yet inclusive of their students’ and their own political beliefs in order to be an  equal participant in politically charged discussions

[9/20/2017] Reading to learn or learning to read? Engaging college students in course readings. 

Kerr, M. M., & Frese, K. M. (2017). Reading to learn or learning to read? Engaging college students in course readings.College Teaching, 65  (1), 28-31. 

Are your students reading what you're assigning? This article offers suggestions for improving the quantity and quality of student reading for class.  Click here to find this article through the IUPUI library.

[9/14/2017] Provided Meaningful Feedback on Students’ Academic Performance

Desrochers, C.G. & Zell, D. (2017). Provided meaningful feedback on students' academic performance. In D. Pollock (Ed.), IDEA Notes on Instruction.

One of Chickering & Gamson’s (1987) Seven Principles of Good Practice in Undergraduate Education, providing prompt feedback can become a struggle the deeper you get in the semester. This article provides suggestions for time-saving strategies to streamline providing feedback on both paper and online assignments.

[9/5/2017] Constraints on academics’ potential for developing as a teacher

Akerlind, G. S. (2007). Constraints on academics’ potential for developing as a teacher. Studies in Higher Education,32(1), 21-37. https://goo.gl/5M7Enz

How do you see yourself developing as an instructor? What activities do you pursue to develop your teaching skills? Have you considered the role of student feedback in your teaching? Read this article to reflect on your growth as an instructor, no matter where you are in the academic ladder.

[8/30/2017] What makes an online instructional video compelling?

Hibbert, M. (2014). What Makes an Online Instructional Video Compelling? Educause Review. Retrieved August 28, 2017 from https://goo.gl/Uqer1r

Online instructional videos take a great deal of time and effort to produce. It'd be a shame if students never watched them. This article provides practical insights for how to create compelling videos for your students; whether you are recording at your desk or in a professional quality studio.



[8/23/2017] How Much Time Should I Spend on Teaching?

Gooblar, D. (2017, July 12). How much time should I spend on teaching? Blog: Pedagogy Unbound. Retrieved August 22, 2017 from https://goo.gl/MMsSeD.

This article begins with a question that all faculty confront at the beginning of the semester and discusses outcomes and rewards that can come with deep involvement, not just for teaching, but also for learning.


[8/17/2017] When Will We Talk About the Syllabus?

Curzan, A. (2017, August 10). When will we talk about the syllabus? The Chronicle of Higher Education. http://tinyurl.com/y8trsw4f.

Are you ready to rethink how you conduct the first day of class? Read this article to see how considering the messages you want to send can help you prioritize what you have yourself and your students do on that first day.

[8/9/2017] College Completion Report 2017

Indiana Commission for Higher Education. (2017). College completion report 2017.  Retreived from www.in.gov/che.  Full report:  https://goo.gl/ahx4J5.  Intro and key takeaways:  https://goo.gl/guZZGH.  IUPUI report:  https://goo.gI/3T8Z6e.  

The 2017 report from the Indiana Commission of Higher Education provides an update on the progress made towards the state's commitment to improving college completion rates.  Data for many of Indiana's post-secondary institutions is included; you can review IUPUI's statistics in the institution report. How do you think we're doing?  

[8/3/2017] The overconfident professor: I know I taught you better than that

Kearney, E.M. & Sheffer, S. (2015). The overconfident professor: I know I taught you better than that. The Teaching Professor, Magna Publications. https://goo.gl/8TgcRJ.

The above article discusses strategies for faculty to monitor their teaching and assessment practices regularly to avoid becoming too familiar and overconfident with it.

[7/26/2017] The impact of findability on student motivation, self-efficacy, and perceptions of online course quality.

Simunich, B., Robins, D. B., & Kelly, V. (2015). The impact of findability on student motivation, self-efficacy, and perceptions of online course qualityAmerican Journal of Distance Education29(3), 174-185. 

As discussed in the above article, it’s important that students be able to find what they are looking for quickly and easily in learning management systems for online and face-to-face courses. The clearer your organization is, the fewer “where is this” questions you’ll need to answer. Schedule a CTL consultation  for a fresh set of eyes to review your Canvas site and help you find places where organization and instructions could be clarified.

[7/19/2017] Dear New Instructor: It's Not All On You

Goodblar, D. (2017, June 28). Dear new instructor: It’s not all on you. https://goo.gl/bBgfuH

[7/12/2017] Effective Online Teaching

O’Malley, Sharon. (2017, July 12). Effective online teaching. Inside Higher Ed. Retrieved from https://www.insidehighered.com

If you’re planning to teach online, the CTL is here to help! Schedule a consultation or visit our website to review our resources on online learning activities and instructional technology.

[7/5/2017] What if Students Revolt?

Seidel, S. B., & Tanner, K. D. (2013). “What if students revolt?”—considering student resistance: origins, options, and opportunities for investigation. CBE-Life Sciences Education, 12(4), 586-595. https://goo.gl/bEJjyP


[6/29/2017] Reducing the Gender Achievement Gap in College Science

Miyake, A., Kost-Smith, L. E., Finkelstein, N. D., Pollock, S. J., Cohen, G. L., & Ito, T. A. (2010). Reducing the gender achievement gap in college science: A classroom study of values affirmation. Science330(6008), 1234-1237. http://science.sciencemag.org/content/330/6008/1234.full


[6/21/2017] Students' Rising Expectations Pose Challenge to Online Programs

Blumenstyk, G. (2017, June 20). Students’ rising expectations pose challenge to online programs. Chronicle of Higher Education. http://tinyurl.com/ycwzkhws

[6/14/2017] Structure Matters: Twenty-one Teaching Strategies to Promote Student Engagement and Cultivate Classroom Equity

Tanner, K. D. (2013). Structure matters: twenty-one teaching strategies to promote student engagement and cultivate classroom equity. CBE-Life Sciences Education12(3), 322-331. http://www.lifescied.org/content/12/3/322.full

[6/7/2017] Stop Talking, Start Walking

Rockquemore, K. A. (2017, June 5). Stop talking, start walking. Tomorrow’s Professor, 1574https://tomprof.stanford.edu/posting/1574

[5/31/2017] Developing Media-savvy Students

Siena, S. (2017, March 21). Developing media-savvy students. Inside Higher Ed.  https://tinyurl.com/ydy4qhr7

 

[5/23/2017] Don’t Be Alone During Office Hours

Freishtat, R. (2017, January 10). Don’t be alone during office hours. Tomorrow’s Professor, 1570. https://tomprof.stanford.edu/posting/1570 

 

[5/17/2017] Taking Time to Refresh, Recharge and Recommit

Weimer, M. (2017, May 17). Taking time to refresh, recharge, and recommit. Faculty Focus. http://tinyurl.com/lczkqux

 

[5/11/2017] 5 Posts Looking Ahead to Summer

Williams, G. (2017, May 3). 5 posts looking ahead to summer. The Chronicle of Higher Education  http://www.chronicle.com/blogs/profhacker/5-posts-looking-ahead-to-summer/64003

[5/5/2017] 5 Posts Looking Ahead to Summer

Williams, G. (2017, May 3). 5 posts looking ahead to summer. The Chronicle of Higher Education  http://www.chronicle.com/blogs/profhacker/5-posts-looking-ahead-to-summer/64003

[4/26/2017] Grading Advice for the End-of-Semester Crunch

Weimer, M. (2009, December 15). Grading advice for the end-of-semester crunch. Faculty Focus. http://tinyurl.com/l6m5noq

[4/19/2017] Getting Our Students Wrong

Goodblar, D. (2017, April 19). Getting our students wrong. The Chronicle of Higher Educationhttp://tinyurl.com/mqez5xa 

[4/12/2017] Learning More About Active Learning

Gooblar, D. (2016, June 29). Learning more about active learning. Chronicle of Higher Education. https://chroniclevitae.com/news/1457-learning-more-about-active-learning 

Read this article for a discussion of evidence suggesting that in order to use active learning strategies effectively, you need to know how to use them well.

[4/5/2017] Scientific Posters: A Plea from a Conference Attendee

Persky, A. M. (2016). Scientific posters: A plea from a conference attendee. American Journal of Pharmaceutical Education, 80(10), Article 162, 1-3. 
http://www.ajpe.org/doi/full/10.5688/ajpe8010162

[3/29/2017] Sometimes You Soar

Nesteruk, J. (2017, March 28). Sometimes you soar. Inside Higher Ed.  http://tinyurl.com/my3stry

[3/15/2017] Participation Points: Making Student Engagement Visible

Almagno, S. (2017, March 13). Participation points: Making student engagement visible. Faculty Focushttp://hubs.ly/H06FQTs0

[2/28/2017] How To Deal With Difficult Students

Reis, R. (2017, February 13). How to deal with difficult students. Tomorrow’s Professor. https://tomprof.stanford.edu/posting/1542

This posting has eight helpful suggestions about how to handle challenging students. It is from chapter 6, How to Run Your Class, of this book: Spalding, D. (2014). Teach your students. Change the world. Wiley Periodicals: San Francisco, CA.

[2/22/2017] How To Deal With Difficult Students

Reis, R. (2017, February 13). How to deal with difficult students. Tomorrow’s Professor. https://tomprof.stanford.edu/posting/1542

This posting has eight helpful suggestions about how to handle challenging students. It is from chapter 6, How to Run Your Class, of this book: Spalding, D. (2014). Teach your students. Change the world. Wiley Periodicals: San Francisco, CA.

[2/16/2017] Being Black, Being Male on Campus

Tate, E. (2017, February 9). ‘Being black, being male on campus’. Inside Higher Ed., https://tinyurl.com/zqarmuz

This article contains an interview with Derrick R. Brooms, author of Being Black Being Male on Campus.

[2/9/2017] Three Common Demands from Students in Large Classes

Reis, R. (2017, February 6) Three common demands from students in large classes and what to do about them. Tomorrow’s Professor, 106(2). https://tomprof.stanford.edu/mail/1540  

[2/1/2017] Evidence-Based Study Strategy

Weimer, M. (2017, January 18). Interleaving: An evidence-based study strategy. Faculty Focus.  http://www.facultyfocus.com/articles/teaching-professor-blog/interleaving-evidence-based-study-strategy/

[1/18/2017] Reflective Writing and the Revision Process

Giles, S. L. (2010). Reflective writing and the revision process: What were you thinking? In Charles Lowe and Pavel Zemliansky (Eds.) Writing Spaces: Readings on Writing, Vol. 1 (pp. 191-204). Anderson, SC: Parlor Press, http://tinyurl.com/gnfmpzx

[1/12/2017] The Benefits of Good Teaching Extend Beyond Course Achievement

Loes, C. N., & Pascarella, E. T. (2015). The benefits of good teaching extend beyond course achievement. Journal of the Scholarship of Teaching and Learning, 15(2), 1-13. Retrieved from http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/EJ1059427.pdf

[1/3/2017] How can we minimize grade challenges?

 Goodblar, D. (2017, January 4). How can we minimize grade challenges? The Chronicle of Higher Education. Retrieved from https://chroniclevitae.com/news/1656-how-can-we-minimize-grade-challenges

[12/19/2016] Our Top 11 Teaching and Learning Articles of 2016

Faculty Focus http://tinyurl.com/j9qadn3

[12/15/2016] Revision is Essential in Teaching, Too

Goodblar, D. (2016, Dec. 14). Revision is essential in teaching, too. Chronicle of Higher Education. Retrieved from https://goo.gl/fnKjc4

[12/7/2016] Thinking about end of course assessment and evaluation?

Either the blog or book chapter listed below is a good starting point for thinking about end of course assessment and evaluation. Together, the two pieces nourish some positive thinking about what to do next time about assessment and evaluation. 

Book Chapter

Bain, K. (2004). How do they evaluate their students and themselves? Chapter 7 in What the Best College Teachers Do. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press. Available as an online resource at IUPUI and IUPU Columbus through University Library: http://iucat.iu.edu/catalog/13877676

Available as a book at many IU campuses: http://iucat.iu.edu/catalog/13877676 

Blog Post

Center for Teaching and Learning, Macomb Community College (2013, June 4). How the best teachers evaluate their students and themselves, matters [Web Log Post]. Retrieved from http://ctl.emacomb.com/blog/2013/06/04/how-the-best-teachers-evaluate-their-students-and-themselves-matters/

[11/30/2016] A New Twist on End-of-Semester Evaluations

Faculty Focus http://www.facultyfocus.com/articles/philosophy-of-teaching/a-new-twist-on-end-of-semester-evaluations/

[11/21/2016] Thanksgiving: Binge or Break?

Rockquemore, K. (November 22, 2010). Thanksgiving:  Binge or break? Inside Higher Ed. https://www.insidehighered.com/advice/surviving/fall11.

[11/18/2016] Meet the Professor Who's Trying to Help You Steer Clear of Clickbait

Dreid, N. (November 17, 2016). Meet the professor who’s trying to help you steer clear of clickbait. The Chronicle of Higher Education. http://tinyurl.com/hjz6rfl

[11/18/2016] Returning to the Classroom After the Election

Center for Research on Learning and Teaching, University of Michigan (November 9, 2016). Returning to the classroom after the election. http://crlt.umich.edu/node/93815

[11/18/2016] Lesson Plans After the Shock

Zamudio-Suarez, F. (November 10, 2016). Lesson plans after the shock: How instructors treated Trump’s win in the classroom. The Chronicle of Higher Education. http://tinyurl.com/hb7zbgb

[11/9/2016] Returning to the Classroom After the Election

Center for Research on Learning and Teaching, University of Michigan (November 9, 2016). Returning to the classroom after the election. http://crlt.umich.edu/node/93815.

[11/9/2016] Lesson Plans After the Shock

Zamudio-Suarez, F. (November 10, 2016). Lesson plans after the shock: How instructors treated Trump’s win in the classroom. The Chronicle of Higher Education. http://www.chronicle.com/article/Lesson-Plans-After-the-Shock-/238360?cid=at&utm_source=at&utm_medium=en&elqTrackId=eb76b0c7373e431b9a2fccef2f04e913&elq=fd4637d6ab4b423e9d0786cb07646db4&elqaid=11440&elqat=1&elqCampaignId=4467.

[11/3/2016] SoTL Evidence on Promotion and Tenure Vitas

Marcketti, S. B., & Freeman, S. (2016). SoTL evidence on promotion and tenure vitas at a research university. Journal of the Scholarship of Teaching and Learning, 16(5), 19-31. http://josotl.indiana.edu/article/view/21152/28638

[10/26/2016] Teaching Intervention Increases Underserved College Student Success

Winkelmes, M., et al. (2016). A teaching intervention that increases underserved college student success.  Peer Review, 18(1/2).  https://www.aacu.org/peerreview/2016/winter-spring/Winkelmes

[10/19/2016] Teaching Intervention Increases Underserved College Student Success

Winkelmes, M., et al. (2016). A teaching intervention that increases underserved college student success.  Peer Review, 18(1/2).  https://www.aacu.org/peerreview/2016/winter-spring/Winkelmes

[10/10/2016] Teaching More by Grading Less

Schinske, J., & Tanner, K. (2014). Teaching more by grading less (or differently). CBE Life Sciences Education, 13(2), 159-166. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4041495/

[10/5/2016] Teaching More by Grading Less

Schinske, J., & Tanner, K. (2014). Teaching more by grading less (or differently). CBE Life Sciences Education, 13(2), 159-166. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4041495/

[9/30/2016] The Mentoring Buck Stops Here

The mentoring buck stops here. (2016, September 22). The Chronicle of Higher Education.
https://chroniclevitae.com/news/1552-the-mentoring-buck-stops-here

[9/21/2016] Diversity in Academe

Diversity in Academe: Disability on Campus (September 18, 2016). The Chronicle of Higher Education. www.chronicle.com/specialreport/Diversity-in-Academe-/55

[9/15/2016] Facilitating Change in Undergraduate STEM Instructional Practices

Henderson, C., Beach, A., & Finkelstein, N. (2011). Facilitating change in undergraduate STEM instructional practices: An analytic review of the literature. Journal of Research in Science Teaching, 48(8), 952-984.  http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/tea.20439/full

[9/7/2016] What college teachers should know about memory

College Teaching, http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/87567555.2011.580636 http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/87567555.2011.580636

[9/1/2016] Teaching and Learning in a Tense Election Season

http://www.crlt.umich.edu/node/92763

[8/24/2016] It's Time To Ditch Our Deadlines

Boucher, E. (2016, August 22)  It’s time to ditch our deadlines, The Chonicle of Higher Education. Retrieved from http://chronicle.com/article/It-s-Time-to-Ditch-Our/237530.

[8/11/2016] Test-enhanced Learning

Brame, C. J., & Biel, R. (2015). Test-enhanced learning: The potential for testing to promote greater learning in undergraduate science courses. CBE-Life Sciences Education14(2), 1-12.  http://www.lifescied.org/content/14/2/es4.long

[8/3/2016] Test-enhanced Learning

Brame, C. J., & Biel, R. (2015). Test-enhanced learning: The potential for testing to promote greater learning in undergraduate science courses. CBE-Life Sciences Education14(2), 1-12.  http://www.lifescied.org/content/14/2/es4.long

[7/27/2016] Classroom Interpersonal Microaggressions

Suárez-Orozco, C., Casanova, S., Martin, M., Katsiaficas, D., Cuellar, V., Smith, N. A., & Dias, S. I. (2015). Toxic rain in class: Classroom interpersonal microaggressions. Educational Researcher, 44(3), 151-160. 10.3102/0013189X15580314. http://edr.sagepub.com/content/44/3/151.full

[7/21/2016] Assessment of Student Engagement in Higher Education

Mandernach, B. J. (2015). Assessment of student engagement in higher education: A synthesis of literature and assessment tools. International Journal of Learning, Teaching and Educational Research12(2), 1-14. Available to download here: http://www.ijlter.org/index.php/ijlter/article/view/367/167

[6/29/2016] Making Learning Meaningful

Kuh, G. D. (2016), Making learning meaningful: Engaging students in ways that matter to them.  New Directions for Teaching and Learning, 2016 (45), 49-56. doi:10.1002/tl.20174.  http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/enhanced/doi/10.1002/tl.20174

[6/22/2016] Making Learning Meaningful

Kuh, G. D. (2016), Making learning meaningful: Engaging students in ways that matter to them.  New Directions for Teaching and Learning, 2016 (45), 49-56. doi:10.1002/tl.20174.  http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/enhanced/doi/10.1002/tl.20174

[6/15/2016] How to Read a Student Evaluation

Perlmutter, D. D. (October 30, 2011). How to read a student evaluation. The Chronicle of Higher Education. http://chronicle.com/article/How-to-Read-a-Student/129553?cid=rclink

[6/8/2016] Teaching Across Difference

Silin, J. (2016). Teaching across difference. Change: The Magazine of Higher Learning, 48(2), 32-33., DOI: 10.1080/00091383.2016.1163202. Click here to view article

[6/1/2016] How Do People Learn?

Reis, R. (2016, June 2). How do people learn? Tomorrow’s teaching and learning. Message posted to Tomorrow’s Professor listserv [Msg 1495], archived at https://tomprof.stanford.edu/posting/1495

[5/26/2016] Using SoTL to Enhance Your Academic Position

Smith, R.A., & Schwartz, B. M. (Eds.), (2015). Using SoTL to enhance your academic position. Retreived from the Society for the Teaching of Psychology web site: http://teachpsych.org/ebooks/usingsotl.

[5/18/2016] Just Listen

Lowman, J. & Aldrich, H. (2016, February). Just Listen. National Teaching & Learning Forum, 25(2), 1-3.

[5/5/2016] A better way to evaluate undergraduate teaching

Weiman, C. (2015).  A better way to evaluate undergraduate teaching.  Change: The Magazine of Higher Learning, 47(1). 6-15

[4/27/2016] A better way to evaluate undergraduate teaching

Weiman, C. (2015).  A better way to evaluate undergraduate teaching.  Change: The Magazine of Higher Learning, 47(1). 6-15

[4/13/2016] Cyber Peer-Led Team Learning (cPLTL)

Feder, E., Khan, I., Mazur, G., Vernon, T., Janke, T., Newbrough, J., Shuck, L., Zhu, L., & Varma-Nelson,P. (2016). Accessing collaborative online learning with mobile technology in Cyber Peer-Led Team LearningEDUCAUSE Review Online, 51(2).

Mauser, K., Sours, J., Banks, J. V., Newbrough, R., Janke, T., Shuck, L., Zhu, L., Ammerman, G., & Varma-Nelson, P. (2011). Cyber Peer-led Team Learning (cPLTL): Development and implementation, EDUCAUSE Review Online, 34.

Smith, J., Wilson, S.B., Banks, J., Zhu, L., & Varma-Nelson, P. (2014). Replicating Peer-led Team Learning in cyberspace: Research, opportunities, and challenges. Journal of Research in Science Teaching, 51(6), 714-740.

McDaniel, J., Metcalf, S., Sours, J., Janke, T., Newbrough, J. R., Shuck, L., & Varma-Nelson, P. V. (2013). Supporting student collaboration in cyberspace: A cPLTL study of web conferencing platforms, EDUCAUSE Review Online.

Varma-Nelson, P., & Banks, J. V. (2013). PLTL: Tracking the trajectory from face-to-face to on-line environments. In T. Holme, M. Cooper, and P. Varma-Nelson (Eds.), Trajectories of chemistry education innovation and reform (pp. 95-110). Washington, DC: American Chemical Society.

[4/7/2016] Cyber Peer-Led Team Learning (cPLTL)

Feder, E., Khan, I., Mazur, G., Vernon, T., Janke, T., Newbrough, J., Shuck, L., Zhu, L., & Varma-Nelson,P. (2016). Accessing collaborative online learning with mobile technology in Cyber Peer-Led Team LearningEDUCAUSE Review Online, 51(2).

Mauser, K., Sours, J., Banks, J. V., Newbrough, R., Janke, T., Shuck, L., Zhu, L., Ammerman, G., & Varma-Nelson, P. (2011). Cyber Peer-led Team Learning (cPLTL): Development and implementation, EDUCAUSE Review Online, 34.

Smith, J., Wilson, S.B., Banks, J., Zhu, L., & Varma-Nelson, P. (2014). Replicating Peer-led Team Learning in cyberspace: Research, opportunities, and challenges. Journal of Research in Science Teaching, 51(6), 714-740.

McDaniel, J., Metcalf, S., Sours, J., Janke, T., Newbrough, J. R., Shuck, L., & Varma-Nelson, P. V. (2013). Supporting student collaboration in cyberspace: A cPLTL study of web conferencing platforms, EDUCAUSE Review Online.

Varma-Nelson, P., & Banks, J. V. (2013). PLTL: Tracking the trajectory from face-to-face to on-line environments. In T. Holme, M. Cooper, and P. Varma-Nelson (Eds.), Trajectories of chemistry education innovation and reform (pp. 95-110). Washington, DC: American Chemical Society.

[3/30/2016] Whistling Vivaldi: How stereotypes affect us and what we can do

Steele, Claude M. (2011). Whistling Vivaldi:  How stereotypes affect us and what we can do. New York, NY: W.W. Norton & Company.  Howard Gardner, author of Frames of Mind:  The Theory of Multiple Intelligences says:  "A remarkable story that begins with personal experience and sparkes ground-breaking research on stereotype threat, leadership of influential institutions, and most important- interventions that make a genuine difference in society."  

[3/25/2016] Small changes in teaching: The last 5 minutes of class

Lang, J. (March 7, 2016). Small changes in teaching: The last 5 minutes of class. Chronicle of Higher Education. Retrieved from http://chronicle.com/article/Small-Changes-in-Teaching-The/235583

[3/17/2016] Small changes in teaching: The last 5 minutes of class

Lang, J. (March 7, 2016). Small changes in teaching: The last 5 minutes of class. Chronicle of Higher Education. Retrieved from http://chronicle.com/article/Small-Changes-in-Teaching-The/235583

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