Scholarly Teaching Symposium

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This annual half-day symposium fosters a culture of scholarly teaching and supports the scholarship of teaching and learning. It provides faculty with a venue to share their promising teaching practices and for disseminating results of scholarly teaching interventions, such as the work of the Curriculum Enhancement Grant awardees.

The 2020 symposium will be held virtually on Friday, October 9, from 9 a.m. to noon.

Register for the Symposium

 

2020 Symposium Highlights

IUPUI Scholarly Teaching Taxonomy

The IUPUI Scholarly Teaching Taxonomy is a framework that articulates five essential dimensions of teaching as a scholarly practice. The taxonomy will be introduced at the symposium by a panel of faculty and adminstrators who will discuss the origin, purposes, framework, and uses of the taxonomy.

Learn more about the taxonomy

Scholarly Teaching Symposium Presentations

Ten-minute virtual presentations will focus on what faculty learned about their own course design and teaching practices, and how they impacted their students’ learning since the pandemic began. Proposals for presentations are due by September 8 and will be reviewed by September 11.

 Call for proposals (Closed)

2019 CEG Presentations

Fifteen-minute virtual poster presentations will focus on the design, implementation, and results of Curriculum Enhancement Grant projects led by faculty from IUPUI and IUPUC. The CEG initiative supports faculty projects designed to improve student learning and success, enhances the conversation about scholarly teaching, and increases the practice of SoTL. 

 

 

Symposium Schedule
Time                        Session
9:00 - 9:10 a.m.

Welcome
Terri Tarr, Director, Center for Teaching and Learning
Kathy Johnson, Executive Vice Chancellor, Chief Academic Officer

9:10 - 9:40 a.m.

IUPUI Scholarly Teaching Taxonomy
Lisa Contino, Terri Tarr, Anusha S. Rao, Richard Turner, Doug Jerolimov, Center for Teaching and Learning

View recording

9:40 - 10:10 a.m.

CEG Presentations - I
(4 concurrent Zoom sessions with two 15-minute presentations per session)

 

Kathryn Berlin and Kathy Visovatti Weaver, School of Health and Human Sciences

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Daniella Kostroun, Jennifer Guiliano, and Rebecca Shrum, School of Liberal Arts

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Stephanie Boys, Stephanie Lyons, and Renee Betts, School of Social Work

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Marquita Walker and William Mello, School of Social Work

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Margaret McNulty and Jessica Byram, School of Medicine



Julie Mendez, Division of Science, IUPUC

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Gina Londino-Smolar, School of Science

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Timothy Hsu, School of Engineering and Technology

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10:10 - 10:20 a.m.Break
10:20 - 10:50 a.m.

Scholarly Teaching Symposium Presentations – I
(4 concurrent Zoom sessions with two 15-minute presentations per session)

 

Enhancing the Zoom Breakout Room Experience with Asynchronous Polling
Jennelle Richardson, School of Medicine

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Engaging Nursing Students in Synchronous Virtual Clinical Experiences
Mila Walker, School of Nursing

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The Research Journal: Student's Experience of Researching During the Pandemic
Patricia Jordan, School of Liberal Arts

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Shared Vulnerabilities: Teaching Within a Relational Theory Framework During Crisis
Katie McCarthy, School of Social Work

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Small Online Teaching Strategies: Enhancing Student Engagement in Collaborative Projects
Celeste Phillips-Salimi, School of Nursing

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Self-Reflection as a Responsive Pedagogy for Virtual Health Professional Student Assessment
Leah Van Antwerp, School of Health and Human Sciences

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More Assignments?  Pivoting to Online Delivery in Senior Biochemistry
Brenda Blacklock, School of Science

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Promises and Perils of Pandemic Teaching: Migrating to Hybrid Engagement
Patricia Herzog, Lilly Family School of Philanthropy

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10:50 - 11:20 a.m.

CEG Presentation – II
(3 concurrent Zoom sessions with two 15-minute presentations per session)

Enhancing the Informatics Curriculum by Bridging Signature Assignments and Assessing Learning Outcomes of Three Required Core Courses
Louie Zhu, Fawzi BenMessaoud, and Ran Chang, School of Informatics and Computing

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Seema Mohapatra, Robert H. McKinney School of Law

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Brad Desnoyer, School of Law

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Christian Rogers, Dan Baldwin, Jason Guy, and Josh Polk, School of Engineering and Technology

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Rob Elliott, Luke Jones, and Xiaonan Guo, School of Engineering and Technology

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Pre-Recorded Presentations

Jason Organ and Andrew Deane, School of Medicine

Seemein Shayesteh, School of Engineering and Technology

11:20 - 11:50 a.m.

Scholarly Teaching Symposium Presentations – II
(3 concurrent Zoom sessions with two 15-minute presentations per session)

Beginning with the End
Debora Herold, School of Science

Activate Language Teaching Online
Haixia Zhao, School of Liberal Arts

Pandemic Pedagogy: Best Practices for Converting Lectures to Online Formats
Hannah Herriott, School of Health and Human Sciences

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Engaging Students in a Large-enrollment Course During COVID-19 Pandemic
Lin Zhu and Tamiko Porter, School of Science

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Pairing Virtual Reality & Virtual Learning: Strategies for Experiential Activities
Audrey Ricke, School of Liberal Arts

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Studying Abroad Virtually: Using Technology to Provide an International Experience
Lamia Scherzinger, School of Health and Human Sciences

11:50 a.m. - 12 p.m.

Reflections on Scholarly Teaching
Doug Jerolimov, Center for Teaching and Learning

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About the symposium

The Scholarly Teaching Symposium is an annual half-day event designed to foster a culture of scholarly teaching and support the scholarship of teaching and learning. It provides faculty with a venue to share their promising teaching practices and for disseminating results of scholarly teaching interventions, such as the work of the Curriculum Enhancement Grant (CEG) awardees.

 This symposium aims to:

  1. Offer instructors of all ranks and appointments an opportunity to gain new perspectives on how their teaching can have a greater impact and be more rewarding for both students and instructors.
  2. Disseminate promising scholarly teaching practices.
  3. Provide an opportunity for faculty to connect with colleagues to form formal and informal networks to advance scholarly teaching.
  4. Strengthen CTL partnerships with other units on campus in support of scholarly teaching.

The project presentations by previous year's CEG scholars are a special feature of the symposium. Their work attests to the values and achievements of engaging in scholarly interrogations of teaching. Beginning in 2020, CEG scholars will present their work at the Scholarly Teaching Symposium, which replaces the and the Scholars Teaching for Student Success event.